Muddymoles: Mountain biking (MTB) in the Surrey Hills and Mole ValleyMuddymoles: Mountain biking (MTB) in the Surrey Hills and Mole Valley

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Endura explores the onesie idea

Posted by Matt, January 24, 2018 There are 5 comments so far

Endura MT500 MTB onesie
I nearly called the MTB onesie a trend, but I still think it’s probably too soon for that.

Back in November I posted about the latest idea for MTB clothing, an MTB onesie from Dirtlej and Vaude – purpose made to look like a regular jacket and trousers combo but hiding a dirty secret. Now Endura have decided to explore the idea.

At the Core Bike show this week – covered elsewhere, including enduro-mtb.com (from where I borrowed this picture) – Endura were showing their MTB onesie for the first time. Based on an MT500 jacket and trousers it looks relatively normal except it is a one-piece.

As I said back in November, I can definitely see an attraction for this sort of kit, the idea being to remove all your mucky kit in one go. This has a lot going for it, especially as a means of returning to normality after a day at a muddy trail centre, for example.

The Endura version is actually a pretty technical piece of clothing as the MT500 range is their high end kit. It’s fully waterproof but very breathable, being made from Exoshell60 3-layer fabric. The Endura MTB onesie comes with zip-off lower legs as well, to provide a bit more flexibility and broaden the MT500 onesie appeal. I suspect it won’t be long before we see the zip off leg idea added to the regular MT500 trouser but that’s just a guess.

All this technology and reputation for quality comes at a hefty price though – about £400 apparently when it finally goes on sale this Autumn (2018). That’s not an inconsiderable amount and is a step up from buying an MT500 jacket and trousers separately (which at current RRP would be £340). Personally I would also like to see the two halves of the onesie available in different colours, although I’m not suggesting D’Andy levels of couture.

I remain intrigued by this whole idea. Partly the idea itself, but also wondering at what point does the MTB onsie become the norm? Are we, as mountain bikers merely getting marketed to, or is there genuine benefit from the whole thing?

Filed under 2018, News in January 2018

Matt

About the author

Matt is one of the founding Molefathers of the Muddymoles, and is the designer and main administrator of the website.

Having ridden a 2007 Orange Five for many years he's recently switched to a YT Industries Jeffsy, alongside a 2016 Marin Pine Mountain.

Lurking in the back of the stable, waiting for it's next chapter is a Kona Big Unit 29er hardtail, while an early On-One Inbred still whispers sweet things to him. You can even find him on road bikes - a Specialized Secteur and a Trek District 1 so far.

If you've ever wondered how we got into mountain biking and how the MuddyMoles started, well wonder no more.

There are 5 comments on ‘Endura explores the onesie idea’

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  1. Elliot says:

    Hmm, suppose I want to take my jacket off at the mid ride cake stop? I’d have to strip off the whole thing. Much to the horror of fellow cake munchers. Suppose I shred the trousers on a bramble? That’s the jacket toast as too. And the price, most of the people I work with have cars worth less than that!!!

    The best that can be said is at least it doesn’t look much like a onesie!

    • Matt says:

      Do you often take your jacket off at cake stops Elliot?! I take your point about damage writing off the whole ensemble, but I think kit like the MT500 range is pretty tough stuff.

      More of a concern for me is that if its not ultra breathable then the window in which to use it is not broad enough to make it worth the cost. If you are regularly out in the worst weather in remote places then that’s a different story. However, in the Surrey Hills I’ve never felt the need for such a high level of technical clothing anyway.

      Glad to see you guys are at least giving the concept some thought!

  2. Gordo says:

    Imagine how simple it would be to get ready for a ride. No more standing in front of the mirror for hours worrying whether my clothes matched nicely.

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